Sustaining Your New Year’s Resolution

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By Jackie Ahern

It’s a little over a week into 2018: a perfect time to reflect on the successes and struggles of those pesky New Year’s resolutions we all seem to make. For those of you that have stuck to your goal of going to the gym more often, or eating more leafy greens, congratulations! Research has shown it takes 21 days to make something a habit, so you’re halfway there! For those of you that haven’t been so successful, you’re absolutely not alone.

New Year’s resolutions are tough. For one, there are a lot of expectations and hype surrounding becoming a newer, better version of yourself, al starting on January 1st (or the 2nd if that NYE party was a real rager); however, in reality, time is relative. There’s no difference between starting a new habit on January 1st or June 1st, other than those 6 months. Granted you live for at least 20 more years (here’s hoping), 6 months is a pretty small fraction. What I’m trying to say is that January 1st isn’t the end-all-be-all for changing your life for the better. If you aren’t able to stick to your first resolution for whatever reason, whether it be that it’s too expensive, too time-consuming or just too difficult to keep up, that’s okay. You don’t have to abandon the resolution; just modify it. When an engineer designs a building but it gets painted the wrong color, they don’t tear down the whole building. They just repaint it.

A good New Year’s resolution, or any lifestyle change for that matter, needs to be something you can see yourself being able to continue for the rest, or most, of your life. For example, I know I cannot completely cut out desert forever (have you ever had ice cream?) but what I could do is cut down on my portion size, or only have it a couple times a week instead of every night. Additionally as a student, working out every day at 7am isn’t exactly sustainable, but working out after class 3 or 4 times a week could be. If down the line you find yourself suddenly hating ice cream, or craving more workouts, you can definitely switch some things up, but in the beginning, its best to start small with more attainable goals.

So what is a good way to assess an attainable, smart goal? Well, there’s a convenient acronym for that. It’s called SMART: Specific, measurable, attainable, relevant and timely. Specific refers to a clear definition of the goal, such as “I will take a 30-minute walk in the morning, 3 times a week” versus just, “I will get in shape.” Measurable means having a way to evaluate how thoroughly the goal has been met, such as marking exercise days on a calendar or keeping a food journal. Achievable means the goal must be within the realm of possibility; for example, “I will lose 1 pound a week” instead of, “I will lose 20 pounds this month.” Talking to a professional like a doctor, dietitian, or personal trainer can help to navigate how achievable a health-related goal is. Relevant refers to how much the goal fits in with your lifestyle and other pursuits. For example, while in school, a resolution such as “I will learn how to swim” may be more relevant than “I will learn how to scuba dive.” Lastly, timely means that the goal should have some defined checkpoint or endpoint, such as “I will eventually be able to meditate for 20 minutes by adding 5 minutes to my meditation every 2 weeks.” Of course, from there you can decide to modify the goal.

And finally… Think about where you were 3 months ago. If you had made just a small lifestyle change then, today could a very different day. With time flying by the way that it does, who knows where you could be in just a few months by taking a small step towards a healthier future, today.

Sweet and Sour Japanese Eggplant Bruschetta

PC: RachelRayMag.com

Ingredients:

  • 4 Japanese Eggplants

  • Extra Virgin Olive Oil

  • 1 White Onion

  • 4 Tablespoons Honey

  • ½ Cup Vinegar

  • ½ Cup Tomato Sauce

  • 1 Medium Ball of Fresh Mozzarella

  • 1 French Baguette

  • Salt and Pepper to taste

Preparation:

1. Sauté peeled and thinly sliced Japanese eggplant in olive oil; reserve.

2. In the same skillet cook thinly sliced onions. Deglaze with honey and vinegar. Add tomato sauce and reserved eggplant. Simmer for 10 minutes, let cool.

3. Spoon onto baguette slices and place mozzarella slice on top. Sprinkle with salt and pepper.

Butternut Squash and Pomegranate Quinoa Salad

Ingredients:

  • 2 Cups Butternut Squash (1/2 inch cubes)

  • 2 Tablespoons Extra Virgin Olive Oil

  • 1 Cup Quinoa (Uncooked)

  • 2 Cups Water

  • 1 Pomegranate Seeds

  • 2 teaspoons Chopped Fresh Sage

  • ¼-1/2 Cup Crumbled Goat Cheese

  • Salt and Pepper to taste

Preparation:

1. Preheat oven to 400 F. Spray a baking sheet with olive oil.

2. Toss the squash with the olive oil and salt and spread in a single layer on the baking sheet. Roast for about 20 min, or until tender, tossing after 10 min.

3. While squash is roasting, prepare the quinoa according to the package.

4. In a bowl, combine the squash, quinoa, and remaining ingredients. Sprinkle goat cheese on top.

Spaghetti Squash with Marinara Sauce

PC: FromTheBartoliniKitchens.com

Ingredients:

  • 1 Spaghetti Squash

 

  • 2 Cups Marinara Sauce

  • Salt and Pepper to taste

Preparation:

1. Cut squash in half lengthwise.  Scoop out the seeds then place the halves cut side down in a baking dish filled with enough water to cover the bottom of the dish.

2. Bake at 350 degrees for an hour or until the shell of the squash is flexible and the inside is tender.  Let the squash cool for 10-15 minutes.

3. Using a fork, scrape out the inside of the squash to form strands.

4. Place all of the squash strands into a large bowl and toss marinara sauce , salt and pepper.  Serve hot.

Fall Veggie Wrap

SerenityInTheStorm.com

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ingredients:

  • 1 Avocado, peeled, pit removed and sliced

  • 1 Tomato, sliced

  • 1 Small Cucumber, sliced

  • 1 Small Red Pepper, cored, de-stemmed and sliced

  • 1 Container of Radish Sprouts

  • Several Leaves of Lettuce (Arugula, Romaine, Red Leaf, etc.)

  • Whole Grain Tortillas or Flat Bread

  • Cream cheese

  • Pesto

Preparation:

Wash and dry all vegetables. Slice and set aside. Take bottled or homemade pesto and mix with cream cheese to desired taste. Spread pesto mixture onto tortilla or flat bread and add veggies to it. Roll and enjoy!

Arugula Basil Salad

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PC: Anna Ng

Ingredients:

  • 1 Tablespoon Balsamic Vinegar

  • 1 Teaspoon Dijon Mustard

  • 1/2 Teaspoon sugar or honey

  • 1 Tablespoon Extra-virgin Olive Oil

  • 2 Cups Arugula

  • 1 Cup Fresh Basil

  • 1/2 Cup Fresh Parsley

  • 1/2 Cup Shredded Pecorino Romano Cheese (or any other hard cheese)

Preparation:

In a large bowl, whisk together the vinegar, mustard, sugar/honey, and olive oil. Add arugula, parsley, and cheese. Toss and serve.

Butternut Squash and Pomegranate Quinoa Salad

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PC: HuffingtonPost.com

Ingredients:

  • 2 Cups Butternut Squash (1/2 inch cubes)

  • 2 Tablespoons Extra Virgin Olive Oil

  • 1 Cup Quinoa (Uncooked)

  • 2 Cups Water

  • 1 Pomegranate Seeds

  • 2 teaspoons Chopped Fresh Sage

  • ¼-1/2 Cup Crumbled Goat Cheese

  • Salt and Pepper to taste

Preparation:

1. Preheat oven to 400 F. Spray a baking sheet with olive oil.

2. Toss the squash with the olive oil and salt and spread in a single layer on the baking sheet.

3. Roast for about 20 min, or until tender, tossing after 10 min.

4. While squash is roasting, prepare the quinoa according to the package.

5. In a bowl, combine the squash, quinoa, and remaining ingredients. Sprinkle goat cheese on top.