Healthy Late Night Snacking

late night snack

By Marisa Morales, UC Davis Nutrition Peer Counselor

In college, you will likely find yourself staying up late at night just to finish your paper that’s due at 11:59pm, or study for an exam you have the next day. Seems like it is just part of college life. You may also notice that the longer you stay up the hungrier you get-you may even find yourself eating as a response to the stress you’re feeling. Have you ever wondered what these late-night snacks might do to your health?

There have been numerous studies on the hypothesis that gaining weight occurs more easily with snacking past 8pm. A nutrition professor at Penn State University, Barbara Rolls, confirmed that this hypothesis is a myth. She states that of the studies and surveys conducted thus far, there has been no significant correlation between weight gain and snacking at night. There is, however, significant evidence showing a positive correlation between weight loss and eating breakfast. In general, we shouldn’t focus on when we eat but instead focus on what we eat. If you feel the urge to snack past 8pm try to opt for nutrient dense foods. Nutrient dense foods are those that provide a high amount of nutrients for the calories. For instance, oranges are a nutrient dense food while cookies are low in nutrient density (provide few nutrients relative to the large amount of calories). Check out the list below for some nutrient dense late night snacks!

  • Apple slices with nut butter
  • Carrots with hummus
  • Greek yogurt
  • Walnuts
  • Plain popcorn
  • Banana and nut butter on wheat toast
  • Eggs
  • Crackers and cheese
  • Celery with nut butter
  • Frozen/unfrozen grapes
  • Protein smoothie

I have always believed that we should listen to our body’s signals. If your body is telling you it is hungry, feed it. Your body knows when it needs energy and it knows when to tell you. I, for one, find it very difficult to continue any task if my mind is focused on food. I know how difficult it can be to find the time to eat when you are running around campus going from classes, to office hours, to work, etc. What you must remember is that in order to get through the day you need to eat. Pack a lunch box with some of the snacks mentioned above (they make great mid-day snacks, too!). If you can try to avoid the hunger, I would highly encourage you to do so. I’m sure I am not the only one who feels like eating a full-on feast of pizza, burgers, and ice cream when I let myself get too hungry. I’ve found that if I have a morning snack, afternoon snack, and night snack in between my normal meals then I feel perfectly satisfied eating smaller, healthier portioned meals.

Recipe: Bedtime Smoothie

Total time: 5 minutes

Ingredients:

1 cup kale leaves

1 cup vanilla yogurt

1 ripe banana

1 tbsp almond butter

2 tsp flax seeds

2 kiwis

½ cup almond milk

Instructions:

  1. Blend all the ingredients together, that’s it!

*take a look at this website for more information on the sleep benefits behind these tasty ingredients! https://helloglow.co/bedtime-smoothie-better-sleep/

What is your favorite late night snack?  Let us know in the comments!

Sources:

https://www.webmd.com/diet/features/late-night-snacks

 

It’s Pumpkin Season Again!

pumpkin bars

By Haley Adel, UC Davis Nutrition Peer Counselor

It’s October so everyone knows what that means…Pumpkin Season! Starbucks has been serving up its assortment of pumpkin spice drinks for weeks, while Trader Joe’s has been lining its shelves with loads of pumpkin-inspired products. To get with the season, we thought we would provide some of the health benefits of pumpkin, and share some of our favorite pumpkin dishes.

For starters, pumpkin is a fruit! This winter squash has seeds inside, and therefore falls into the fruit category. Contrary to its categorization, most culinary preparations of pumpkin treat it as a vegetable. Either way, it is a great source of nutrients! For starters, pumpkin is high in carotenoids. Carotenoids are nutrients that serve as antioxidants. That means they help protect the body from certain damage and stress.  Carotenoids are also converted to Vitamin A, making pumpkin a great way to increase Vitamin A. This vitamin supports both eye sight and skin health.

More importantly for students, pumpkin is full of nutrients that help strengthen the immune system. These include Vitamin C and Vitamin E, in addition to Vitamin A. The benefits come from the ‘meaty’ part of pumpkin. If you don’t like the taste of pumpkin, but love the seeds, there are health benefits for you too! Pumpkin seeds, also known as pepitas, are packed with antioxidants. Additionally, they are high in magnesium, which is important for bone health.

Pumpkin is a delicious seasonal treat. Since it is commonly available for only a part of the year, we may not always take advantage of its different culinary prospects. We know pumpkin pie is always a favorite, but we wanted to include some recipes for less common uses of pumpkin. Our first recipe is for pumpkin turkey chili. It’s a tasty meal that will keep you warm as the weather begins to chill. Our second recipe is for easy yet scrumptious pumpkin chocolate chip bars that satisfy the sweet tooth.

Not only are these recipes delectable, but they also provide the nutritional benefits mentioned above because they include pumpkin puree. If you want the health advantages of pumpkin, make sure the product you consume is made from actual pumpkin. A pumpkin-flavored treat can also be delicious, but will just not provide the same favorable benefits. If you enjoyed the recipes we included, please let us know in the comments section!

Pumpkin Turkey Chili

pumpkin chili

Prep time: 15 minutes             Cook time: 20-30 minutes

Ingredients:

  • 2 T olive oil
  • 2-3 cloves garlic, minced
  • 1 yellow onion, diced
  • 3 large carrots, peeled and diced
  • 1 bell peppers, diced
  • 1 lb ground turkey
  • 1 28-oz can diced tomatoes
  • 1 15-oz can white beans, drained
  • 1 14-oz can pumpkin puree
  • 1/5 cup tomato paste
  • 1 cup bone broth
  • 1 T cocoa powder
  • 2 T chili powder
  • 1 T ground cumin
  • 2 teaspoons pumpkin pie spice
  • Salt and pepper to taste

Instructions:

  1. Add oil to large pot over medium-high heat. Once hot, add in onion, garlic, carrots, and bell pepper and sauté until soften, about 5-7 minutes.
  2. Add in ground turkey. Cook until meat is no longer pink.
  3. Add in diced tomatoes, white beans, pumpkin, tomato paste, broth, cocoa powder and seasonings, stirring everything together.
  4. Reduce heat to medium-low and simmer for 20-30 minutes, stirring occasionally.
  5. Enjoy!

Recipe from:  Clara Norfleet @foodfitnessandfaith

Pumpkin Chocolate Chip Bar (pictured above)

Prep time: 5 minutes             Cook time: 28 minutes

Ingredients:

  • 2 ½ cups oats
  • 1 cup pumpkin puree
  • 2 eggs
  • ½ cup canola oil
  • ¼ cup honey
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla
  • ½ teaspoon cinnamon
  • ½ teaspoon ground ginger
  • ½ teaspoon pumpkin pie spice
  • ½ teaspoon salt
  • ½ cup semi-sweet chocolate chips

Instructions:

  1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees.
  2. Grease an 8×8 glass pan with cooking spray
  3. Mix oats, pumpkin puree, eggs, oil, honey, vanilla, salt, and spices in bowl until combined. Stir in chocolate chips.
  4. Pour mixture into greased pan and bake for 28-30 minutes.
  5. Let sit for 15-20 minutes
  6. Cut into squares and devour!

Recipe from:   Melanie   http://www.nutritiouseats.com/pumpkin-chocolate-chip-oatmeal-bars/

References:

Brown, Mary J. “Top 11 Science-Based Health Benefits of Pumpkin Seeds.” HealthLine, 24 Sept. 2018, www.healthline.com/nutrition/11-benefits-of-pumpkin-seeds#section5.

Raman, Ryan. “9 Impressive Health Benefits of Pumpkin.” HealthLine, 28 Aug. 2018, www.healthline.com/nutrition/pumpkin.

 

Integrating Veggies (college edition!)

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By:  Ines Cheng, Healthy Aggies Intern

As college students it is often difficult to maintain a healthy lifestyle. The time and energy it takes to make healthy meals can sometimes seem burdensome. However, there are many different strategies to more easily integrate vegetables and fruits and other healthy foods into your everyday life!

  1. Smoothies!

It can be difficult to eat as many fruits as you would like throughout the day. One easy way to incorporate fruits is to make smoothies in the morning. Combine some of your favorite fruits and add some protein (like yogurt or soy milk) to make a smoothie for a quick and easy breakfast. An extra step is to add spinach! Spinach is great for your skin, hair, and bone health and provides protein, minerals, and vitamins.

  1. Pack Veggies as Snacks

A great way to incorporate veggies throughout the day is to pack them before you leave the house. This way if you are hungry throughout the day you won’t have to buy a snack; the one you have is healthier than the alternative you could buy at the store on campus. Some easy snacks to carry around are carrot sticks, tomatoes and celery; pack a little cup of hummus or a string cheese stick to round it out.

  1. Meal Prep

Everyone is constantly raving about meal prepping because it really helps! Setting aside a couple hours in one day is much more efficient than spending time each day making food. Create big batches of healthy meals that you will be able to eat throughout the week. You will be less likely to eat out if you know you have food all ready to eat.

  1. Side Orders

It can be difficult to choose the healthier option at a restaurant. However, by making a conscious effort to replace one side with a healthier alternative benefits you. An example is to choose a salad instead of fries. Or replace certain pieces of the meal with healthier choices, such as a lettuce wrap instead of bread with a burger. This is a fantastic way to incorporate vegetables in meals when you go out.

  1. Know Where To Eat Out

In Davis it can be difficult to find restaurants that have healthy options. However, most restaurants will have at least one healthier option or one that you can alter in some way. Whenever you can, look for that balanced plate in the meal your order – a serving of protein, a whole grain, if possible, and some fruits and veggies.  Ask for what you want!

Overall, living a healthy lifestyle can seem difficult but it is all about making small changes over time. Choosing healthy options over others (and doing it consistently) will alter your health for the better. Incorporating any of the above tips will help you eat in a more healthy manner without dramatically changing your life.

https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/270609.php

 

 

Earth Day- Let’s make a better place for all of us

By Jessica Bonilla, Dietitian Assistant

We are only four days away from Earth day, which makes it a perfect time to think about our actions for the past years. According to the ASCE, Americans generate around 258 million tons of material solid waste every year, only about 35% of the waste is recycled and 53% goes into landfills. What have we done so far to solve the problem about pollution and solid waste? The best way to help is to start with ourselves by making more sustainable decisions.

This year, Earth Day is dedicated to raise awareness about plastics and how to reduce them. Here are four ways to reduce our overall carbon footprint and waste:

  • Meatless Mondays

Meatless Mondays is a movement around the world that consists in cutting meat once a week. The purpose of this movement is to decrease the carbon and water footprint generated by the production in meat, which is generally larger than crop products. Actually, it’s estimated that one pound of meat requires more than 2,000 gallons of water for its production.

By making this shift and decreasing the amount of meat in our diet, we are not only helping the planet, but we may also reduce the risk of heart disease and other chronic diseases.

vaca

  • Eat local

Buying local is a great strategy to support sustainability. This is because we will be buying food that hasn’t traveled very far distances and therefore hasn’t emitted lots of greenhouse gases during the trip. Our food will be fresher, and we will be supporting local businesses and economy. In addition, we can also buy food cheaper because there is a high supply in the seasonal fruits and vegetables. Fruits and veggies out of season can have a higher price due to the distance and the number of people involved in the process.

FM

  • Reduce, reuse, recycle

The three R’s reduce, reuse and recycle are three actions that we all should include in our daily basis in order to decrease our overall waste and to conserve natural resources

The first R, reduce, has the purpose decrease the amount of waste that we produce in a day-to-day basis. Implement this action to your routine by avoiding disposable items, printing in both sides of paper, drinking from reusable water bottles instead of plastic bottles, switching to cloth napkins for paper napkins and by decreasing consumption of products with lots of wrapping.

The second R, reuse, consists in using again older things that we have or finding them other usages than what they are intended for originally. Some examples are: using old envelopes as note pads, using old jars to store kitchen stuff, using paper that is printed already on one side, donating books and old clothes.

The last but not least is recycle, which means collecting and transforming into new products materials that would otherwise be considered as trash. Some materials that can be recycle are plastic bottles, cardboard, metal (tin, aluminum, steel), and glass.

r

  • Bike more and drive less.

Riding a bike is beneficial to the environment by the simple fact that no pollution is excreted. Riding a bike will also increase your strength, endurance, cardiovascular fitness and can help as a stress reliever. In addition, you will save money because no oil is required. Skip traffic and try to use your bike to get from point A to point B. Luckily for us, Davis is a very bike friendly town!

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Did you know that UC Davis is planning to meet the goal of zero waste by 2020? Help to reach the goal by making sustainable choices and reducing your waste!

UC Davis Farmers Market back for spring!

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By Rebekah Shulman, Dietitian Assistant

Attention all Aggies: the UC Davis Farmers Market is back on campus for Spring Quarter! Here you will find tons of fresh produce, raw honey, bread and baked goods, UC Davis made olive oil, and much more.  The market aims to be a destination in itself, not just something students stumble upon during their commute across campus.  The Farmers Market will be at the North Quad every Wednesday from 11 am to 1:30 pm for Spring Quarter.

Here are the vendors you will find for the Spring 2018 season:

  • PURE honey
  • Ahmad Farms: fruit
  • Toledo Farms: assorted organic veggies and fruits, potatoes
  • Fruit Factory: fruits
  • Williamson Farms: Strawberries
  • Shoup Farms: avocado
  • UC Davis Student Farm: flowers, veggies
  • Gotelli Farms: cherries in May
  • Upper Crust Bakery: breads, cookies, apple tarts

Visiting the UC Davis Farmers Market is a great way to promote health and wellness in all aspects of your life.  Here are some of the benefits of taking some time out of your day to visit the market:

 

Education

In addition to buying food at the market, you can learn more about health and wellness through visiting the Student Health and Counseling Services and Healthy Aggies booths.  These organizations seek to educate individuals on how to maintain a healthy lifestyle as a busy college student.  Be sure to visit these booths to hear about campus resources, play fun games, get some free swag, and learn more about various nutrition and wellness topics.

 

Nutrition

The accessibility of a Farmers Market on campus makes getting your fresh fruits and vegetables even easier! Here you don’t have to worry about your produce containing pesticides, waxes, or genetic modification. Additionally, fruits and vegetables contain lots of vitamins and minerals as well as fiber to keep you full, energized, and nourished throughout your day.

You can find easy recipes using ingredients found at the farmers market on our website at:

https://healthy.ucdavis.edu/food-nutrition/farmers-market/recipes

 

Self-Care

The Farmers Market is able to bring the community together and create a calming environment for everyone to enjoy.  At the market you will find picnic blankets strewn across the grass where students can take a break from their busy day to relax and enjoy the sunshine.  Taking time out of your day to unwind, spend time with friends, and get some vitamin D are extremely beneficial for mental wellbeing.  These study breaks will help you retain information and focus more effectively for the rest of the day.

 

Supporting Local Business

As large agribusiness is increasingly dominating U.S. food production, a great benefit of the Farmers Market is the ability to directly support local growers and businesses.  Instead of buying produce harvested before ripeness halfway across the globe, your money is directly supporting family farms in the Yolo County area.  This also benefits the environment through reducing the amount of fossil fuels used to transport produce from farm to consumer.

 

 

In summary, visiting the UC Davis Farmers Market is a quick and easy way to support a healthy lifestyle.  Be sure to head to the North Quad on Wednesdays between 11 am and 1:30 pm to buy fresh produce and take a break from your busy day.

 

Healthy Aggies Promotion:   the market will be giving away $10 bundles in market dollars to the first 10 people who visit the Market Information Booth on April 11 and say “I read about $10 in free vouchers on the Healthy Aggies blog”! While supplies last!

 

You can find up-to-date information on the UC Davis Farmers Market and subscribe to their weekly newsletter at: https://healthy.ucdavis.edu/food-nutrition/farmers-market

The UC Davis Farmers Market

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By:  Debbie Dang, Nutrition Peer Counselor, UC Davis Fitness and Wellness Center

Guess what’s back Aggies? That’s right! The UC Davis Farmers Market!

The UC Davis Farmers Market (UCDFM) is a seasonal opportunity for students to have better access to fresh and local produce! This market is a smaller-scaled version of the main Davis Farmers Market (occurs at Central Park on Wednesdays and Saturdays), and is geared more towards students!

The campus market has two seasons, Fall and Spring. Fall markets run on Wednesdays from October 4th through November 8th. The UCDFM occurs at the Memorial Union North Quad from 11:00 AM to 1:30 PM! Spring dates are Wednesdays from April 4 through June 6 at the same location. UCDFM vendors accept a variety of payment options including cash, debit, EBT, credit, and even Aggie Cash! Using your EBT card gets you additional ‘market match’ dollars – up to $10 more produce.

So what are some reasons you should shop at UCDFM?

  1. Convenience
    The UCDFM is perfect for students because it is located at the hub of campus, the Memorial Union. Buy some ripened, ready-to eat produce to add to your lunch!
  2. Taste
    Locally grown produce tastes better than conventional produce because it is fresher, seasonal and travels less distance compared to produce from the market.
  3. The Environment
    Local, family farmers likely use fewer pesticides and minimal processing—techniques that increase sustainability in production! And because the produce travels a shorter distance, this reduces the carbon footprint of the food’s production.
  4. Local Agriculture
    As the global economy is expanding, family farmers struggle to keep up with large agribusiness. When you buy from small, local farmers you help them stay competitive in the food market!
  5. The Community
    Contribute to UC Davis’ strive to promote nutrition and sustainability by meeting our farmers and supporting different school organizations like Healthy Aggies, the Student Farm, and the UC Davis Olive Center!

Here are some highlights you want to check out!

  • Free Samples with Healthy Aggies
    IMG_20171004_123758Healthy Aggies is having free food demonstrations at the UCDFM and providing free samples and recipe sheets. Ingredients are provided by the Coho and local vendors.

 

  • Raw and Infused Honey from Pure Honey
    IMG_20171004_120506Sourced in Winters, CA, Pure Honey provides a unique array of honeys that are only available in this region! You can choose from this selection:Raw Honey
    Orange Blossom
    Wild FlowerInfused Honey
    Lavender
    Cinnamon
    Habanero
    Caramel with HoneyFor more information, you can visit their website at http://www.PureHoneyCA.com

 

  • Olive Oil and Vinegars for sale at the market
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    The UC Davis Bookstore is collaborating with the UC Davis Olive Center by selling our very own Olive Oil and community produced vinegars! You can choose from this tasty selection:Olive Oils
    Wolfskill Reserve Estate—an herbaceous, grassy olive oil that is blended with picual, mission, arbequina and empeltre olives)

    Gunrock Estate
    —A tribute to UC Davis’s mascot, Gunrock, this olive oil is blended with 20 different olive varieties to create a stone fruit and grassy taste.
    Roasted Garlic Olive Oil—A simple, must-have olive oil flavored with roasted garlic.Vinegars
    Barrel-aged Balsamic Vinegar—An all-round sweet and tart vinegar that is perfect for not only for dressings and marinades, but also ice cream and berries, too!

    D’Anjou Pear White Balsamic Vinegar—
    A flavorful vinegar that is tart, yet sweet.Mission Fig Balsamic Vinegar—This vinegar is a mixture of the classic Californian mission fig and a traditional vinegar from Moderna, Italy.

    More information is posted on the UC Davis Olive Center website at www.olivecenter.ucdavis.edu/products

 

  • Fresh Produce and Products from Various Vendors
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    Don’t miss out on fresh produce from our local farmers! The Student Farm will also be there to sell fresh produce that is produced on campus. They are dedicated to providing fresh flowers, vegetables, and culinary and medicinal herbs to our students.Check out the Student Farm on Facebook or their website, here.Support your local farmers and join the health community by eating fresh produce!

 

Healthy Aggies’ welcome to Fall 2017!

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By:  Jackie Ahern, Nutrition Peer Counselor, UC Davis Fitness and Wellness Center

Fall is upon us once again! For some it’s the beginning of a whole new college adventure, and for others it’s the beginning of the end. It’s no doubt an exciting time, where everyone has something to look forward to, new changes to make and novel things to try. Change can be scary, but it can also be beautiful and fun and exciting if you look at it the right way. As we go into the new school year I encourage all of you to embrace all that is new, and reflect on how far you’ve come.

I remember when I first started at Davis, I felt alone and scared of this giant new campus. I voiced the fear of being alone and lost to a yoga teacher of mine and he said to me,

“Do what you love and what makes you happy, and your true friends will gravitate towards you.”

I found this hard to believe at the time, when the only friend I had was my roommate; regardless I took that advice and ran with it. That seems like only yesterday when I first started, but here I am now, beginning my fourth year at Davis, with an incredible group of friends that just seems to keep growing. I’m surrounded by people I’ve known since the first few weeks of freshman year, to new people I’ve met in the last month. And like my teacher said, it feels like they just keep gravitating towards me. I’d like to extend this advice to you all as well. Do what you love, be open to new experiences and you will find the supportive, amazing people you deserve.

You may also face pressures to a join a certain group or declare a particular major but in the end it’s your life. Being on your own, making your own choices, doing your own laundry; that’s adulthood. Take a moment to reflect or journal about what truly makes your heart sing and follow that path. The new school year is the perfect time to reevaluate your life choices and habits up to this point, and make a change if you find it’s necessary. Be open to life as it unfolds before you. This campus is vast in both the people on it and in what it has to offer, so take a new class, talk to a stranger or try a new cuisine. This is just the beginning of your entire life. Emphasis on the “your” life part!

I wish you all good luck this year, remember that you are part of a huge community full of opportunity and goodness. Take each day by the horns, take a deep breath, and be true to yourself. Everything will happen exactly as it should!