Spaghetti Squash with Marinara Sauce

PC: FromTheBartoliniKitchens.com

Ingredients:

  • 1 Spaghetti Squash

 

  • 2 Cups Marinara Sauce

  • Salt and Pepper to taste

Preparation:

1. Cut squash in half lengthwise.  Scoop out the seeds then place the halves cut side down in a baking dish filled with enough water to cover the bottom of the dish.

2. Bake at 350 degrees for an hour or until the shell of the squash is flexible and the inside is tender.  Let the squash cool for 10-15 minutes.

3. Using a fork, scrape out the inside of the squash to form strands.

4. Place all of the squash strands into a large bowl and toss marinara sauce , salt and pepper.  Serve hot.

Fall Veggie Wrap

SerenityInTheStorm.com

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ingredients:

  • 1 Avocado, peeled, pit removed and sliced

  • 1 Tomato, sliced

  • 1 Small Cucumber, sliced

  • 1 Small Red Pepper, cored, de-stemmed and sliced

  • 1 Container of Radish Sprouts

  • Several Leaves of Lettuce (Arugula, Romaine, Red Leaf, etc.)

  • Whole Grain Tortillas or Flat Bread

  • Cream cheese

  • Pesto

Preparation:

Wash and dry all vegetables. Slice and set aside. Take bottled or homemade pesto and mix with cream cheese to desired taste. Spread pesto mixture onto tortilla or flat bread and add veggies to it. Roll and enjoy!

Arugula Basil Salad

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PC: Anna Ng

Ingredients:

  • 1 Tablespoon Balsamic Vinegar

  • 1 Teaspoon Dijon Mustard

  • 1/2 Teaspoon sugar or honey

  • 1 Tablespoon Extra-virgin Olive Oil

  • 2 Cups Arugula

  • 1 Cup Fresh Basil

  • 1/2 Cup Fresh Parsley

  • 1/2 Cup Shredded Pecorino Romano Cheese (or any other hard cheese)

Preparation:

In a large bowl, whisk together the vinegar, mustard, sugar/honey, and olive oil. Add arugula, parsley, and cheese. Toss and serve.

Butternut Squash and Pomegranate Quinoa Salad

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PC: HuffingtonPost.com

Ingredients:

  • 2 Cups Butternut Squash (1/2 inch cubes)

  • 2 Tablespoons Extra Virgin Olive Oil

  • 1 Cup Quinoa (Uncooked)

  • 2 Cups Water

  • 1 Pomegranate Seeds

  • 2 teaspoons Chopped Fresh Sage

  • ¼-1/2 Cup Crumbled Goat Cheese

  • Salt and Pepper to taste

Preparation:

1. Preheat oven to 400 F. Spray a baking sheet with olive oil.

2. Toss the squash with the olive oil and salt and spread in a single layer on the baking sheet.

3. Roast for about 20 min, or until tender, tossing after 10 min.

4. While squash is roasting, prepare the quinoa according to the package.

5. In a bowl, combine the squash, quinoa, and remaining ingredients. Sprinkle goat cheese on top.

Spaghetti Squash Salad

Spaghetti-Squash_18286.jpg

Ingredients

  • 4 Cups Cooked Spaghetti Squash (one large squash)

  • 6 Sliced Jumbo Black Olives (add more to taste)

  • 1/2 Cup Chopped Green Pepper

  • 3 Tbsp Chopped Fresh Chives

  • 3 Tbsp. Olive Oil

  • 1 Tbsp. Balsamic Vinaigrette

Preparation:

Chop peppers and chives and slice olives. When squash is cooled, remove from shell and mix everything together. Salt and pepper to taste.

Note: Makes four 1 cup servings.

 

Healthier Holiday Favorites

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Food is an essential part of how we celebrate the holidays. Most traditional holiday foods are rich and delicious, but don’t always satisfy our bodies’ needs. In order to stay active and immune to sickness during the holidays, we need quality fuel that will sustain our bodies. Here are some superfoods and recipes to help you stay balanced this holiday season:

  • Use healthier alternatives to vegetable oil. Coconut oil can be used in place of butter and is full of medium-chain triglycerides, which provide long, clean, sustained energy. Coconut oil also contain lauric acid, which helps fight off pathogens. Coconut oil can tolerate high temperatures and is perfect for frying and baking. Other alternatives are grapeseed oil and extra virgin olive oil.
  • Replace chocolate with raw chocolate, also known as cacao. Cacao beans are a good source of magnesium, and ounce of the raw nibs has six per cent of your recommended daily iron intake. Phenylethylamine is a chemical found in cacao that our bodies also make naturally when we’re excited. It causes the pulse to quicken, making us feel focused and alert.
  • Add dark, leafy greens such as spinach and swiss chard to recipes whenever possible. Greens are high in vitamins A, C, calcium and many others. Add them to other holiday side dishes, such as stuffing, casseroles, soups and stews.
  • This time of year squash is everywhere, especially butternut squash. This staple of the fall season contains fiber, potassium, magnesium and vitamins A and C. Squash can be baked, steamed, served plain with a sprinkle of your favorite seasoning, or pureed and made into soup! Try the recipe here for homemade butternut squash apple soup.
  • Cranberries are one of my personal favorites when it comes to holiday foods. Half a cup of cranberries contains 11 % of the recommended daily value for vitamin C. They also boast antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and anti-cancer benefits. The less processed and more whole the berries, the better. Find a healthy cranberry sauce recipe here.
  • Substitute applesauce for oil, margarine or butter in muffins and quick breads like banana bread. Try substituting a small amount at first, as the more you substitute the more the texture of the finished product changes.
  • Additional tips: For dips, sauces, and pie toppings, use low-fat greek yogurt in the place of sour cream. Use sliced almonds make a crunchy topping in place of fried onion rings.

What Is SPE, and Why Is It Important?

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UC Davis Dining Services is proud to partner with SPE Certified to bring UC Davis Aggies a healthy and sustainable meal option at the Dining Commons. You can find SPE Certified meals at Segundo, Tercero, and Cuarto Dining Commons for breakfast, lunch, and dinner every day of the week. So what is SPE? Greg Deligdisch, VP Marketing of SPE Certified writes a guest post:

What is SPE?

SPE stands for Sanitas Per Escam, literally Health Through Food in Latin. It’s an apt “promise” for a unique third-party certification and consulting company that is defining a new way to eat. In essence, SPE Certified enhances the nutritional quality of meals without compromising taste, thereby ensuring that every dish is healthy, sustainable and most of all, delicious.

SPE Certified is the first of its kind, a revolutionary new brand providing a universal, trusted standard for food — similar to what LEED® is to buildings and the Good Housekeeping Seal of Approval® is to household products. So when students see the distinctive SPE logo (dubbed a “squiggly, red insignia” by The New York Times), they will know those dishes have been properly sourced, are nutritionally balanced and taste great.

Healthy food need not be boring

SPE was created by Emmanuel Verstraeten, Founder and CEO, to build a bridge between the culinary and scientific worlds and to ensure that for the first time, healthy food did not need to be boring. So in 2001, he brought together a chef and a dietitian (truly an odd couple!) and opened the first SPE restaurant in Brussels named Rouge Tomate, followed in 2008 by Rouge Tomate New York. From the beginning, though, the goal was to expand beyond, with the restaurants serving only as the “incubators”, real-life laboratories for this unique culinary philosophy. So in May 2012, he launched SPE Certified, through which all foodservice establishments — restaurants, cruise lines, school and university cafeterias, airlines, corporate cafeterias, hospitals, etc. – can now access the ultimate in nutritionally balanced, sustainable food.

Within months of launching, blue-chip brands such as Celebrity Cruises, UMass Amherst, Hotel Plaza-Athénée NY and Michelin-starred Danji and Seasonal restaurants jumped on the “health bandwagon” and became SPE-certified. SPE Certified is now proud to partner with UC Davis, the first school to become certified on the West Coast.

Why eat SPE?

The latest health, or rather un-health, numbers are staggering: in 2030, 42% of the US population will be obese, and it is getting worse every year. Increasing numbers of Americans are suffering from diet-related diseases such as diabetes, heart disease and cancer – all contributing to skyrocketing health care costs. Verstraeten created SPE with a real desire not only to affect positive change, but also to reach as many men, women and children as possible. And what better place to showcase this compelling brand, indisputably at the center of the current (white-hot) health and nutrition conversation, than in the cutting-edge, sustainably-focused cafeterias of  UC Davis?