A Supervisor Guides You Through the CoHo at UC Davis

 

 

coho_ca_Padar (1)

By:  Jackie Ahern, Nutrition Peer Counselor, Fitness and Wellness Center, UC Davis

Every visit to the Coffee House seems to feel like an obstacle course. Do you wait in a 20 minute line just to wait another 15 for a latte? Should you get a salad? But the pizza line is pretty short… Where did she get that poke bowl?

Fear not. Let me guide you through saving money, time and options for plant eaters.

Saving Pennies        

As a college student, I’ll take any opportunity to save a few cents. Bring your own coffee cup to get 25 cents off any espresso drink and coffee refills for only $1.50. On top of that, bring your own clean plate or bowl for food purchased at the Coho and get 25 cents off your purchase. Saving pennies and the planet! And more: Skip the tortilla on your taco salad and save another 50 cents.

Skipping the Line

This year, the Coho rolled out a fancy new system: Tapingo. Through an app on your smartphone, you can now pre order and pay for your meal through the Tapingo app. No more waiting in line, nifty!

Avoiding Peak Hours

            If you’re able to, try to avoid the peak times. These include 9-10 am and 12-1 pm. Additionally 10 minutes before and after the hour are generally pretty busy any time of the day. Plan ahead to avoid the rush.

Vegetarian & Vegan Options

            I’ve spent my entire college career scouting out vegetarian and vegan options. It’s been a long process but here’s the wisdom I’ve gathered at each food area:

Swirlz: You can get almost any espresso drink made with soy for a few more cents. The only drink that can’t be made with soy are blasts, which are made with ice cream. Shucks.

  • Vegan note: The caramel, pumpkin spice and white chocolate sauces all have milk in them, but the chocolate sauce is vegan!

Ciao: Check out the hot sandwich line to the left and load up a delicious garden patty or black bean burger!

  • Vegan note: All the breads are vegan except for the whole wheat bun; it has yogurt in it.

Cooks: Stop by on Meatless Monday for delicious meat-free options every week at Cooks. They also distinguish vegan and vegetarian options on the menu.

TxMx: Ask for ½ beans ½ rice on your burrito or taco salad for an inexpensive and complete protein option! Also try out the Tofu Rojas made with delicious seasonings.

  • Vegan note: Make sure to ask for “no cheese” on your tortilla, as their default has cheese

Croutons: Load up a build your own baked potato or build your own salad for a nutritious and filling meal. Once it’s made, sprinkle on some nutritional yeast (those yellow flakes) for a nutty, cheesy and vitamin packed topping.

Chopstixx: Get your soup on with vegetarian pho (made with vegetable broth) and try out the quick and easy vegetarian sushi roll made with avocado, cucumber and carrots.

Fickle Pickle: Tofu salad is a great vegan addition to your usual sandwich, or throw it on a bagel with hummus!

 

Best wishes for managing the CoHo maze. In the end the drinks are caffeinated, the food is warm and the company is good. And if you have questions, just ask an employee. They’re there to help!

Food Trends

foodtrendv2“Gatorade? Pass. Lay’s Sour Cream and Onion? Next.”

“I’ll have the coconut water with a side of kale chips, please.”

Have you noticed the shift of popular foods that has been sweeping through magazines, organic grocery stores, and devoted foodies? Of all the trendy foods that are on the shelves, I’ll admit that it’s hard to decide which one is worth the hype. I’ve compiled a list of myths and facts for the latest food trends to help you decide.

Coconut

Myth: Coconut water is better than water during and after a workout

Fact: Coconut water has been glorified as nature’s sports drink because of the amount of electrolytes it contains. However, for most individuals consuming well-balanced meals throughout the day, water can hydrate them just as well as coconut water does. Also, coconut water contains high amounts of potassium, but after a long high intensity workout what your body really needs is sodium.

Tea

Myth: Drinking green tea will cause weight loss

Fact: Although green tea temporarily boosts metabolism slightly, it’s not enough to cause weight loss. Tea is still beneficial to the body in other ways with its ability to:

  • reduce blood pressure
  • lower cholesterol
  • decrease risk of heart attack
  • promote eye health by reducing risk of cataracts

Grains

Myth: Grains are bad for you because they contain gluten

Fact: Gluten is a protein found in the grains wheat, barley, rye and oats. Individuals with celiac disease will experience intestinal damage and discomfort when they consume gluten. However, for individuals without celiac disease, gluten is safe to eat and there’s no proven benefit of eating a gluten-free diet. Most grains are actually good for you, such as:

  • brown rice
  • wild rice
  • barley
  • oats
  • whole grain pasta and bread

Remember to look for 100% whole grain products

Sustainable and Local Products

Myth: Eating sustainable and local is too difficult

Fact: Sustainable farming results in nutritious food that supports farmers and local businesses that will help the economy.

What does it mean to eat locally?

  • Food is produced locally rather than nationally or internationally
  • Food is grown close to your home and distributed in short distances.

What is sustainable food?

Raising food that is

  • healthy for consumers and animals
  • doesn’t harm the environment
  • humane for workers

You can make easy changes by going to the Davis Farmer’s Market and purchasing products that are grown and made locally.

Asian Fusion

Myth: Chinese food is bad for you

Fact: Many people believe that Chinese food is nutritionally bad for you because of high levels of sodium and oil in the food. Although Chinese food is known for containing MSG, a salt added to enhance the flavor of food, you can ask for food without MSG! Also, ask for your food to be cooked with less oil to reduce the calories. There are many healthy options you can try, such as varieties of Asian vegetables and lean protein such as tofu, shrimp, and chicken. When you want to add Asian flavor to your dishes at home, try using ginger, garlic, green onion, or low sodium soy sauce, all of which add flavor without calories.

Alternate forms of protein

Myth: I need to eat meat to get enough protein in my diet

Fact: There are plenty of vegetarian or vegan sources of protein, such as nuts, grains, tofu, beans, eggs, and dairy products (low fat yogurt and milk)

It’s important to consume foods with amino acids that your body can’t make. These foods are considered “complete protein” sources. Combinations of vegetable foods creating complete proteins include:

  • corn and beans
  • brown rice and split peas
  • avocado, sprouts & almond butter on whole wheat bread
  • tofu

Smaller portion sizes

Myth: The Freshmen 15 happens to everyone

Fact: Weight gain can be easily avoided by being aware of the portion size you’re eating inside the dining commons. Try to grab one plate at a time and enjoy the food while you’re eating it. Here are some other tips for controlling portion size:

  • use smaller bowls, plates, and cups
  • when you eat out only eat half or split the meal with a friend

What are the correct portion sizes?

  • a teaspoon of margarine is the size of one dice
  • three ounces of meat is the size of a deck of cards
  • one cup of pasta is the size of a baseball
  • an ounce and a half of cheese is the size of four stacked dice
  • one-half cup of fresh fruit is the size of a tennis ball