Healthy Tips for Eating Out

eatinghealthyout-PROOFWhether you are eating out at a restaurant or at the UC Davis Dining Commons, there are many options for good tasting foods; often including foods you may never make at home and in quantities you would not usually prepare for yourself. Sometimes this can make it challenging to create a healthy meal. There are also positives to eating out. Visiting a new restaurant presents the exciting opportunity to try new meals that may even inspire you in your own kitchen. Keep these tips in mind to ensure that your restaurant meal will be both enjoyable and healthy.

Remember MyPlate to balance your choices:

  • If possible, try a taste of the meal first before choosing an entrée.
  • If your options are pasta, potatoes, rice, and bread, choose one from this group. The foods you didn’t choose today will most likely be offered again tomorrow.
  • Include a source of protein in every meal. Make a salad into a meal by adding beans, cottage cheese, or tofu. Consider pairing grilled chicken breast with some veggies or grains, or as a lean protein addition to a salad.
  • Opt for low-fat condiments such as mustard, tomato sauce, seasoned vinegar, low fat salad dressing, and fat free cream cheese. Use high fat condiments (like mayo, gravy, creamy sauces, salad dressing, and cream cheese) sparingly.
  • Balance is key! If you choose a high fat main dish, choose something light (like fruit) for dessert. If you choose a lighter entree (like grilled chicken breast salad with low fat dressing), enjoy a higher fat dessert. If you had dessert at lunch, skip it at dinner.

Ask the waiter or server how items are prepared or served. Don’t be afraid to ask for substitutions, the staff is happy to provide them for you.

  • Substitute egg whites into your omelet or scramble at breakfast and use plain yogurt instead of sour cream on breakfast potatoes. Top with salsa for added flavor.
  • Ask for light salad dressings such as lemon juice or olive oil and vinegar.
  • Ask the server to “hold the mayo” and ask to put sauces, salad dressings, and other extras on the side. If you choose to use them, apply sparingly or dip your fork in the dressing/sauce to get a tiny flavor boost with each bite.
  • Ask for a side green salad, steamed vegetable, or fruit cup in place of the cole slaw, potato salad, or fries that normally comes with it.

Most restaurant meals come in larger portions than you would normally eat if you made a meal at home. Ask for smaller portions, or take steps to control portions on your own.

  • Have a light snack before you go, such as a piece of fruit, a small carton of yogurt, or a small handful of nuts.
  • Remove your plate as soon as you feel full. Remember that it takes up to 20 minutes for your brain to register that your stomach is full.
  • Share a large entree or dessert, or consider putting half of the portion in a to-go box for later.
  • Drink a tall glass of water before you start eating and/or several glasses during your meal.
  • Enjoy a cup of herbal tea at the end of your meal as a substitute for dessert.

Do you have any strategies to improve the health of your meal when you eat at the dining commons, or visit your favorite restaurants? Share by leaving a reply below!

What is Your Food Package Telling You?

Post-7-Banner

Growing up I loved reading mystery novels and playing mystery board games. Yes, I was a Nancy Drew and Clue type of girl. I was captivated by the thrill and challenge of solving crimes with just a few hints…Mrs. Peacock in the library with a candlestick. It was fun decoding things that didn’t always mean what they appeared to be on face value.

Now that I’m older, sometimes I feel like I’m playing a confusing mystery game whenever I shop for groceries. Food packages have a variety of health claims and what do they really mean anyways? Is multigrain better than whole grain? Are organic cookies better for me? And if it says no trans fat then I can eat as much of it as I want, right?

This post is going to walk you through some of the challenges of understanding food packages. So grab your detective gear and let’s get started!

Multigrain vs. Whole Wheat Bread

When shopping for bread, we often automatically assume brown is good and white is bad. This may not necessarily be true. The key to understanding the difference between types of bread is to remember the word whole, which means the bread contains the entire grain. The reason why we look for whole grain is because the outer layer of the grain, the bran, is high in nutrients and dietary fiber. Without the word “whole” listed on packages, you won’t be receiving the health benefits associated with the bran.

  • Whole grain bread includes any grain. Examples of grains include quinoa, bulgur, rye, oats, and wheat.
  • Whole wheat bread only contains wheat as the grain.
  • Multigrain bread simply means that different types of grain were used to make the bread but it doesn’t mean that it’s necessarily more nutritious. Remember that the key is to look for the word “whole”!

Remember to look at the ingredients list. You want to see that the first ingredient contains the word whole, such as whole grain, whole wheat, etc.

No Trans Fat

When one serving of the product contains less than 0.5 g of trans fat, it can be labeled as 0g or no trans fat. However, if you see the words partially hydrogenated in the ingredients list, the food contains trans fat. Unlike saturated fat, trans fat is artificially created by the food industry and does not naturally occur in most foods. Try avoiding foods containing partially hydrogenated oils because trans fat has been associated with increased bad cholesterol, decreased good cholesterol, and increase risk of heart disease.

Lightly Sweetened

Products that are lightly sweetened don’t necessarily mean it’s low in sugar. It may surprise you to know that the FDA doesn’t regulate the term lightly sweetened. The FDA does regulate sugar-free and no added sugar, but what’s the difference?

  • Sugar-free: less than 0.5 g of sugar per serving
  • No added sugar: no sugar was added during processing

Organic

The term “organic” means plant foods are grown without the use of pesticides, synthetic fertilizers, sewage sludge, genetically modified organisms, or ionizing radiation. Animals used for meat, poultry, eggs, and dairy products aren’t given antibiotics or growth hormones. There are three categories for labeling organic foods:

  • 100% organic
  • Organic: made with at least 95% organic ingredients
  • Made with organic ingredients: made with at least 75% organic ingredients

Keep in mind that foods labeled as organic can still be in high in fat, sugar, salt, or calories. Don’t depend on the organic label to tell you if it’s nutritious, always read food labels carefully!

Natural

The FDA defines foods without added color, artificial flavors, or synthetic substances as natural. However, these requirements don’t make a huge impact on ensuring the nutritional value of the food. For example, salt and sugar are natural ingredients but it doesn’t mean we should consume them in excess. To avoid falling into the all-natural trap, steer away from products with ingredients you can’t pronounce, which contain preservatives and food additives.

Is Eating Late Bad For Your Health?

Open Late

As a recent college graduate, I often find myself reminiscing about the good old days.

Whenever I take a walk down memory lane, it’s always fun to remember freshman year in the dorms, including, of course, late night cramming. One of my favorite memories is venturing on late night food runs! It’s one of the many defining moments that make the college experience unique.

As most of you know, college students stay up until the wee hours studying (or attempting to do so). And let’s face it, when it hits midnight and you have an insatiable desire to munch on something salty, chewing on gum isn’t going to cut it.  At that point, trying to resist eating is pretty much a losing battle (instant noodles, anyone?)

For years, there has been a negative connotation associated with late night eating. The popular saying, “eat breakfast like a king, lunch like a prince and dinner like a pauper” has become the popular mantra surrounding a healthy lifestyle. So the age-old question becomes, is eating late bad for your health?

Not necessarily.

Weight maintenance occurs when the caloric intake equals energy expenditure. This means that at the end of the day the total amount of calories you’re consuming is what matters the most for weight control. The common problem with late night eating is that we often opt for unhealthy foods or we tend to overeat. Here are some things to consider the next time those late night hunger cravings hit:

Are you really hungry?
Using food as a coping mechanism is common. When we feel anxious, happy, or even bored, we tend to turn to food. When you get the urge to snack, ask yourself if you’re really hungry or if you’re simply bored and want something to do. Try finding non-food mechanisms to cope with your emotions, such as going out for a walk or talking with a friend.

Choose smart options.
Yes, it may be tempting to drive to the nearest fast food restaurant but the overly processed food you’ll find there will leave you feeling bloated and sluggish.

What to look for:

  • Snacks and smaller meals that are easier to digest compared to large meals.
  • Low-fat cheese, yogurt, and lean meat all contain slow digesting protein that will allow you to feel full.
  • Fruits and vegetables are guilt-free snack options low in calories but high in vitamins and minerals. They are also high in fiber, which will help fill you up.
  • Complex carbohydrates, such as whole grains, increase levels of serotonin in our bodies. Serotonin regulates mood and contributes to overall emotional well-being.

Curb late night hunger by trying:

  • Greek yogurt topped with your favorite fruit.
  • Whole grain crackers with low fat cheese and sliced turkey.
  • Whole wheat bread filled with hummus and veggies.
  • A sandwich on whole wheat bread, lean meat, and veggies.
  • Oatmeal topped with sliced bananas.

Be prepared!
Having fresh healthful ingredients on hand will make it easier to combat junk food temptations. Stock up on your favorite snack options when you go grocery shopping so you’ll always be ready when hunger hits.